Author Archives: Motherhaus

you are water
I’m water
we’re all water in different containers
that’s why it’s so easy to meet
someday we’ll evaporate together

but even after the water’s gone
we’ll probably point out to the containers
and say, “that’s me there, that one.”
we’re container minders

– Yoko Ono, 1967

 

Dr. Masaru Emoto’s Water Experiment reminds me of Yoko Ono’s “We’re all Water,” except this adds a fascinating metaphysical element. If words, music, and environment can alter water in such profound ways, imagine how we are all affected, considering humans are 60% water.

 

Through the 1990’s, Dr. Masaru Emoto performed a series of experiments observing the physical effect of words, prayers, music and environment on the crystalline structure of water. Emoto hired photographers to take pictures of water after being exposed to the different variables and subsequently frozen so that they would form crystalline structures. The results were nothing short of remarkable.

Read more here: http://highexistence.com/water-experiment/
Dr. Emoto’s site: http://www.masaru-emoto.net/english/water-crystal.html

Below is a documentary on Dr. Emoto’s work:

This is fantastic. Artist Dan Savage has partnered with Wondersauce and over 100 filmmakers to create streaming yule log-inspired short films. Here’s a taste:

Check out all 52 Yule Logs at watchyulelog.com (scroll down to get to the videos).

They’ve really thought this through: once you select a video, you can choose to loop it, or just let the site serve up one video after another.

Read more at Cool Hunting.

Worldbuilding is an essential part of any work of fiction. But especially for science fiction or fantasy, it’s the lifeblood of storytelling. But when worldbuilding fails, it can wreck your whole story, and leave your characters feeling pointless. Here are seven deadly sins of worldbuilding.

1. Not thinking about basic infrastructure. How do they eat? What do they eat? Who takes away the garbage? Who deals with their bodily wastes? How do they get around? What do the majority of people do to survive? You’re not just constructing a society, you’re creating an economy. People don’t oppress each other for fun — usually, systems of hierarchy and oppression have an economic component to them. Maybe you need a lot of peasants to grow labor-intensive crops, or maybe you need lots of cannon fodder in your space war. Maybe your only source of protein is a weird fungus that needs to be tended by specially trained people. Maybe everybody’s eating algae. In any case, there’s nothing worse than a fictional world where there are elaborate social structures, which seem completely separated from the realities of food, shelter and clothing.

Continues at: 7 Deadly Sins of Worldbuilding

I’ve been trying to track down this track for years.

 

“My name is Yon Yonson,
I come from Wisconsin.
I work in a lumber mill there.
When I walk down the street,
The people I meet.
Say: What’s your name?
And I say:
My name is Yon Yonson,
I come from Wisconsin.
I work in a lumber mill there…”

by Kurt Vonnegut

 

Rich or poor, luxury is only luxury when it stands out from our usual experience. Otherwise it is just ordinary. There is nothing unusual about a global brand. There is no element of surprise. There is only, at best, delivering what is expected.

Here’s a great article on the state of luxury in today’s global market.

http://www.hudsonwalker.com/2015/09/28/new-markets-dont-change-the-old-realities-of-luxury-by-misha-pinkhasov/

 

Minion Yellow is a customized shade issued by Pantone with the express purpose of promoting the current installment of a certain film franchise which opened last weekend in theaters nationwide. It’s supposed to make people feel happy. But it makes me feel worried.

Source: Pantone’s “Minion Yellow” Isn’t Just Annoying, It’s Bad For Designers

Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman is trying to answer a big question: Do we experience the world as it really is … or as we need it to be? In this ever so slightly mind-blowing talk, he ponders how our minds construct reality for us.