Category Archives: Brand

Results-proven. Integrity-driven. Industry-leading.

Urgo Hotels & Resorts had expanded its offerings beyond hotels and resorts and was seeking to redesign their existing website to more effectively communicate its vision, expertise, level of quality, and commitment to customer satisfaction, as well as to improve online exposure.

They required a site that:

  • Provides a modern web presence, accessible from all devices
  • Promotes Urgo’s expanded offerings
  • Increases and converts visitors
  • Gives current and potential customers, as well as job candidates, the means to contact the Urgo
  • Provides a content management system that will allow Urgo to manage content on the site

RESULTS: We designed and developed a new website built on WordPress, the world’s most widely-used Content Management System, providing a professionally designed theme to match the brand and meet Urgo’s functional needs, leveraging property photos throughout the site to increase engagement. New copy was written to reflect the voice of the brand clearly and concisely. Emphasis was be placed on attracting new customers through easy-to-understand product and service specifications, a focus on features that make Urgo’s services superior to the competition, and Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

View the site: http://urgohotels.com

View more from Motherhaus: http://motherhaus.com

We’ve been partnering with the New York couture atelier Angelo Lambrou for the last four years to help them refine their brand and streamline their communications.

Our most recent work includes a new website that improves the presentation of their latest collections and conveys the rich history of the brand, now with more video content.

Learn more here, or visit AngeloLambrou.com

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Every facet exquisitely rendered

Rinek, Inc. is a luxury home builder based in Palm Coast, Florida. Their website and overall brand were feeling dated and did not reflect their company today.

Our team’s assignment:

  • redesign their logo
  • develop a blue-based color palette
  • rethink the site architecture to address each of their target markets
  • rewrite all site copy to be more succinct
  • leverage the photography for a more visual user experience
  • establish Rinek as the first choice for luxury homes in Florida’s most desirable communities.

RESULTS: a fresh, modern brand image and an easy-to-navigate, visually-driven, SEO-optimized site with clear user paths for a better user experience that drives an increased response rate. View site: http://rinekinc.com

View more from Motherhaus at http://motherhaus.com

Worldbuilding is an essential part of any work of fiction. But especially for science fiction or fantasy, it’s the lifeblood of storytelling. But when worldbuilding fails, it can wreck your whole story, and leave your characters feeling pointless. Here are seven deadly sins of worldbuilding.

1. Not thinking about basic infrastructure. How do they eat? What do they eat? Who takes away the garbage? Who deals with their bodily wastes? How do they get around? What do the majority of people do to survive? You’re not just constructing a society, you’re creating an economy. People don’t oppress each other for fun — usually, systems of hierarchy and oppression have an economic component to them. Maybe you need a lot of peasants to grow labor-intensive crops, or maybe you need lots of cannon fodder in your space war. Maybe your only source of protein is a weird fungus that needs to be tended by specially trained people. Maybe everybody’s eating algae. In any case, there’s nothing worse than a fictional world where there are elaborate social structures, which seem completely separated from the realities of food, shelter and clothing.

Continues at: 7 Deadly Sins of Worldbuilding

 

Rich or poor, luxury is only luxury when it stands out from our usual experience. Otherwise it is just ordinary. There is nothing unusual about a global brand. There is no element of surprise. There is only, at best, delivering what is expected.

Here’s a great article on the state of luxury in today’s global market.

http://www.hudsonwalker.com/2015/09/28/new-markets-dont-change-the-old-realities-of-luxury-by-misha-pinkhasov/

 

Minion Yellow is a customized shade issued by Pantone with the express purpose of promoting the current installment of a certain film franchise which opened last weekend in theaters nationwide. It’s supposed to make people feel happy. But it makes me feel worried.

Source: Pantone’s “Minion Yellow” Isn’t Just Annoying, It’s Bad For Designers

Did you know that Finland has a Brand Book? I haven’t made it through this 365-page monster yet, but once you get past the cringe-worthy hyperbole of the first few pages, it actually turns pretty interesting. And insanely granular: there’s even a mission for grandparents.

http://www.demoshelsinki.fi/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/TS_Report_EN.pdf

This is a pretty cool thought project, even though it kind of breaks the first of the five basic principles of flag design. That’s an awfully talented child who can draw this flag from memory.

http://www.flagofplanetearth.com

 
Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don’t have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.

Spoilers:

1. Keep it Simple. So simple that a child can draw it from memory.
2. Use meaningful symbolism. The flag’s images, color or patterns should relate to what it symbolizes.
3. Use two to three basic colors.
4. No lettering or seals. Never use writing of any kind.
5. Be distinctive (or related)