Category Archives: Perpetrating

 
The business model of “free” is the business model of Corporate Surveillance.

“There are plenty of reasons to be discomforted by the recent NSA PRISM scandal, chief among them the total obliteration of any remaining notion of privacy we might have had. But there’s another less pressing, yes, but still confidence-shattering concern that has echoed around our internet’s hallowed halls this past week: the fact that this massive, top-secret, data-mining government enterprise allowed a drunk eight-year-old to design their PowerPoint slides.”

via The Best and Worst Redesigns of PRISM’s Atrocious PowerPoint.

There’s some logic to his argument, but given his company’s history in particular (see Nestlé Boycott and Child Slave Labor Practices), the idea of privatizing water and putting control in the hands of corporations is absolutely horrifying.

h/t: Nestle CEO: ‘Access to water should not be a public right’ | Death and Taxes.

Nestlé CEO Peter Brabeck:

Water is of course the most important raw material we have today in the world.It’s a question of whether we should privatize the normal water supply for the population. And there are two different opinions on the matter.

The one opinion which I think is extreme is represented by the NGOs who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means that as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme solution.

And the other view says that water is a foodstuff like any other and like any other foodstuff it should have a market value.

Personally I believe it’s better to give a foodstuff a value so that we’re all aware that it has its price and then that one should take specific measures for the part of the population that has no access to this water, and there are many different possibilities there.

I’m still of the opinion that the biggest social responsibility of any CEO is to maintain and ensure the successful and profitable future of his enterprise. For only if we can ensure our continued longterm existence will we be in the position to actively participate in the solution of the problems that exist in the world. We’re in the position of being able to create jobs.

[later he praises a video of a Nestlé factory in Japan]

The Japanese. You can see how modern those factories are, highly robotized, almost no people.

Hypocrisy Much?

The human palate is arguably the weakest of the five traditional senses. This begs an important question regarding wine tasting: is it bullshit, or is it complete and utter bullshit?

There are no two ways about it: the bullshit is strong with wine. Wine tasting. Wine rating. Wine reviews. Wine descriptions. They’re all related. And they’re all egregious offenders, from a bullshit standpoint.

Exhibit A: Wine experts contradict themselves. Constantly.

Statistician and wine-lover Robert Hodgson recently analyzed a series of wine competitions in California, after “wondering how wines, such as his own, [could] win a gold medal at one competition, and ‘end up in the pooper’ at others.” In one study, Hodgson presented blindfolded wine experts with the same wine three times in succession. Incredibly, the judges’ ratings typically varied by ±4 points on a standard ratings scale running from 80 to 100. Via the Wall Street Journal:

A wine rated 91 on one tasting would often be rated an 87 or 95 on the next. Some of the judges did much worse, and only about one in 10 regularly rated the same wine within a range of ±2 points.

Mr. Hodgson also found that the judges whose ratings were most consistent in any given year landed in the middle of the pack in other years, suggesting that their consistent performance that year had simply been due to chance.

It bears repeating that the judges Hodgson surveyed were no ordinary taste-testers. These were judges at California State Fair wine competition – the oldest and most prestigious in North America. If you think you can consistently rate the “quality” of wine, it means two things:

1: No. You can’t.

2. Wine-tasting is bullshit.

via Wine tasting is bullshit. Here’s why..

From Gizmodo:

“This is a post I’ve been wanting to write for a while. In fact, it stems from something I noticed way back in August of last year. After digging for answers and even a couple attempts at contacting their customer support, I’ve concluded that LinkedIn is by far the creepiest social network.

“The primary reasons LinkedIn is the mustached, trench coat and wire frame glasses wearing mouth breather of the internet are the “People You May Know” and “People Also Viewed” features.

“Let’s begin with the “People You May Know” feature. Every time I sign in, I’m startled by one of the names they suggest. My reactions range from ‘How did you know I know them?’ to ‘There’s no way you should know I know them’ to ‘Ok, I don’t know that person, but they have the same name as someone I do know, and you shouldn’t even know that.'”

Continued at Gizmodo: Is LinkedIn the Creepiest Social Network?

What is Pecha Kucha?

Well, for starters it could be the first step to the death of our “Death by PowerPoint” presentation style.

Each presenter is allowed 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds each – giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up. This keeps presentations concise, the interest level up, and gives more people the chance to show.

http://www.pecha-kucha.org/

Actual stories provided by travel agents:

I had someone ask for an aisle seats so that his or her hair wouldn’t get messed up by being near the window.

A client called in inquiring about a package to Hawaii. After going over all the cost info, she asked, “Would it be cheaper to fly to California and then take the train to Hawaii?”

I got a call from a woman who wanted to go to Capetown. I started to explain the length of the flight and the passport information when she interrupted me with “I’m not trying to make you look stupid, but Capetown is in Massachusetts. “Without trying to make her look like the stupid one, I calmly explained, “Capecod is in Massachusetts, Capetown is in Africa.” Her response … click.

A man called, furious about a Florida package we did. I asked what was wrong with the vacation in Orlando. He said he was expecting an ocean-view room. I tried to explain that is not possible, since Orlando is in the middle of the state. He replied, “Don’t lie to me. I looked on the map and Florida is a very thin state.”

more at link:Why americans should never be allowed to travel

Guise

PC infidel that I am, I recognize my status as one of the unenlightened when it comes to the relative merits of the whole iCulture.

Their quite-pretty-but-not-quite-functional portable telephones notwithstanding, I have come to accept (and have been corrected repeatedly when repudiating this) that Apple and its products represent the begin-and-end-all of everything worthwhile in design, music, art, film, technology and culture in general. The company is, therefore, above criticism of any type. It is irreproachable, infallible. It is iIt.

However, I do believe this blogger has a valid point (and a PC too, no doubt):

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.san&art_aid=97917