Category Archives: Representing

If you’ve ever fantasized about living in a real-life Lego home, your dream could finally come true.

French architecture firm Multipod Studio recently unveiled a prototype for the PopUp House, a customizable home made from stackable blocks. It can be designed, ordered, and built in about a month.

Check out the design for the first homes, located in the pine valleys of Southern France.

And you thought building Ikea furniture was daunting.

 

Source: Lego Pop-Up House construction – Tech Insider

The Gashlycrumb Tinies is a quaintly morbid alphabet book written by Edward Gorey in 1963. The book recounts the unsettling deaths of 26 children, each representing a letter of the alphabet, in rhyming dactylic couplets.

 

Source: The Gashlycrumb Tinies: Alphabet Book for the Morbid – disinformation

you are water
I’m water
we’re all water in different containers
that’s why it’s so easy to meet
someday we’ll evaporate together

but even after the water’s gone
we’ll probably point out to the containers
and say, “that’s me there, that one.”
we’re container minders

– Yoko Ono, 1967

 

Dr. Masaru Emoto’s Water Experiment reminds me of Yoko Ono’s “We’re all Water,” except this adds a fascinating metaphysical element. If words, music, and environment can alter water in such profound ways, imagine how we are all affected, considering humans are 60% water.

 

Through the 1990’s, Dr. Masaru Emoto performed a series of experiments observing the physical effect of words, prayers, music and environment on the crystalline structure of water. Emoto hired photographers to take pictures of water after being exposed to the different variables and subsequently frozen so that they would form crystalline structures. The results were nothing short of remarkable.

Read more here: http://highexistence.com/water-experiment/
Dr. Emoto’s site: http://www.masaru-emoto.net/english/water-crystal.html

Below is a documentary on Dr. Emoto’s work:

This is fantastic. Artist Dan Savage has partnered with Wondersauce and over 100 filmmakers to create streaming yule log-inspired short films. Here’s a taste:

Check out all 52 Yule Logs at watchyulelog.com (scroll down to get to the videos).

They’ve really thought this through: once you select a video, you can choose to loop it, or just let the site serve up one video after another.

Read more at Cool Hunting.

This is a pretty cool thought project, even though it kind of breaks the first of the five basic principles of flag design. That’s an awfully talented child who can draw this flag from memory.

http://www.flagofplanetearth.com

 
Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don’t have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.

Spoilers:

1. Keep it Simple. So simple that a child can draw it from memory.
2. Use meaningful symbolism. The flag’s images, color or patterns should relate to what it symbolizes.
3. Use two to three basic colors.
4. No lettering or seals. Never use writing of any kind.
5. Be distinctive (or related)

Happy Mother's Day from Motherhaus

Be a mother. Help a mother.

You can help mothers and their babies
have a healthy start together by supporting
EVERY MOTHER COUNTS.

Every Mother Counts (logo)

Every Mother Counts is a maternal health organization that links mothers to providers of essential care by addressing three barriers to maternal health:

TRANSPORTATION
Many women live miles away from healthcare providers and facilities, with extremely limited access to transportation.

EDUCATION
Skilled attendance at all births is considered to be the single most critical intervention for ensuring safe motherhood.

SUPPLIES
Health centers and caregivers lack the basic supplies and equipment necessary to do their jobs.

Dedicated to making pregnancy and childbirth safe for every mother, Every Mother Counts informs, engages, and mobilizes new audiences to take actions and raise funds that support maternal health programs around the world.

“Each preventable death is one death too many.”
~ Christy Turlington Burns

EVERY MOTHER COUNTS IS A REGISTERED NON-PROFIT 501(C)(3) ORGANIZATION.

http://everymothercounts.org/products/donate

 

When they learn the truth, people rediscover their humanity. Support the Fashion Revolution.

“Every day, you affect someone’s life because you get dressed. And what you buy to wear can actually make a difference,” Andrea Paltzer wrote in a blog post for Fashion Revolution. “It can have a huge social impact. Fashion can be an answer to poverty. It should not be the cause of poverty and environmental destruction.”

If you would like to support our campaign and help to build a better future for everyone in the global fashion supply chain, please donate via the following link:

http://fashionrevolution.org/get-involved/support-us/

Even donating €2 will help make a difference.

#whomademyclothes

To improve his drawing skills, CaptainPeru bought a sketch book and started drawing every day using only a pen (so that he couldn’t make any mistakes).

He has been drawing something related to his daily life every day for the last two years. Every anniversary he draws his first drawing to review his progress. The book turned two years old a couple of weeks ago.

Discipline is key to improving one’s craft.

www.instagram.com/capitanperu
www.facebook.com/captainperu

Drawing every day – two years progress – Imgur.

Storytelling is a powerful thing. Here’s what Thom Hartmann had to say a few years ago on his radio program:

It’s interesting. In preliterate societies, which is the majority of the history of the human race, we didn’t write things down. We told stories. Everything had a story. Every tree had a story. Every rock had a story. Every animal had a story. Every place had a story. Every family had a story. Story was how we transmitted culture and it was how we remembered things.

When I lived in Vermont—I believe it was the University of Vermont, one of the colleges there—I heard of the Abenakis, the Native American tribe there. They have stories of what happened 10,000 years ago, when the mountains of blue ice, the walls of blue ice, receded: what happened, where and when, the order in which it happened, and things like that. A bunch of geologists checked it out, and the memory was accurate. A 10,000 year-old accurate memory.

There are a number of anthropologists over the years who’ve pointed out how literacy has really been a curse in some ways, as much as a blessing, because when we started writing things down, we stopped telling stories. We stopped having these multi-generational stories. We stopped teaching our children. And it’s so important that there be some stories that transcend literacy, that transcend the written down, the “here, it’s in a book.” It’s so important that we teach our children stories.

Thom Hartmann
29 January 2009

 
The enigmatic Canon 1 à 2 from J. S. Bachs Musical Offering (1747), The manuscript depicts a single musical sequence that is to be played front to back and back to front.
Video by Jos Leys (http://www.josleys.com) and Xantox (http://strangepaths.com/en/)