Pantone’s “Minion Yellow” Isn’t Just Annoying, It’s Bad For Designers

Minion Yellow is a customized shade issued by Pantone with the express purpose of promoting the current installment of a certain film franchise which opened last weekend in theaters nationwide. It’s supposed to make people feel happy. But it makes me feel worried.

Source: Pantone’s “Minion Yellow” Isn’t Just Annoying, It’s Bad For Designers

Do we see reality as it is?

Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman is trying to answer a big question: Do we experience the world as it really is … or as we need it to be? In this ever so slightly mind-blowing talk, he ponders how our minds construct reality for us.

Technology You Didn’t Know Still Existed: The Telegram

western-union

Today, where disposable instant messaging, emails, texts and tweets are all around us, it is a pleasant surprise to find out that the grandfather of quick communication is still with us.

Yes, it is still possible to send a personal, hand-delivered telegram.

Source: Technology You Didn’t Know Still Existed: The Telegram

Finland has a Brand Book?

FInland Brand Book

Did you know that Finland has a Brand Book? I haven’t made it through this 365-page monster yet, but once you get past the cringe-worthy hyperbole of the first few pages, it actually turns pretty interesting. And insanely granular: there’s even a mission for grandparents.

http://www.demoshelsinki.fi/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/TS_Report_EN.pdf

The International Flag of Planet Earth

Astronaut Portrait

This is a pretty cool thought project, even though it kind of breaks the first of the five basic principles of flag design. That’s an awfully talented child who can draw this flag from memory.

http://www.flagofplanetearth.com

Roman Mars: Why city flags may be the worst-designed thing you’ve never noticed

 
Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don’t have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.

Spoilers:

1. Keep it Simple. So simple that a child can draw it from memory.
2. Use meaningful symbolism. The flag’s images, color or patterns should relate to what it symbolizes.
3. Use two to three basic colors.
4. No lettering or seals. Never use writing of any kind.
5. Be distinctive (or related)